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Wednesday, November 28, 2007

Do You Like My New Do????

I was a little shocked to say the least when my husband came to me the other day and suggested I get Larkyn's Hair cut.
So this morning Reegan, Larkyn and myself went to Beaner's for the first cut. I new that taking pictures would be out of the question... I mean how can I take a picture when I'm holding a screaming baby.
Larkyn did not let me down... The trauma first started when I needed to hand to her the stylist for just a second. Her reaction only reassured me that Larkyn has certainly bonded to me.
While I was sitting on a child size rocking horse holding her and comforting her she cried and cried... The poor thing,, we only managed to trim the bangs and once she could finally turn around and get a good cuddle from me she was A. O.K.

In the end I think her new do looks fantastic.

Tuesday, November 27, 2007

Miss Shadow

How cute is this... Miss Shadow decided to climb into Larkyn's high chair. She was so content that I decided to put a bib on her and feed her some kitty snacks. She is such a good Cat and Larkyn and her are starting to get very cute together.
It appears I am not a young as I used to be. For the past month I have been having pain in both my wrists and forearms. This week my Doctor confirmed that carrying Larkyn around has pulled and strained the muscles. His suggestion to stop holding her so much... Like that's going to happen !!!!! Boy do I feel old!!!

Friday, November 23, 2007

Ryker and Larkyn watching Reegan outside.

Even with just a skiff of snow Reegan decided that she could still make a snowman. Good for you Miss Reegan..

Reegan had one of her best friends over yesterday. They are such goof balls!!!

Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Testing the lights

Today was the day to test our outside Christmas lights... We must ensure that all the bulbs are working and blinking. This year Reegan felt she was old enough to change the bulb's. Larkyn on the other hand wanted desperately to take part in pulling at the lights,, and was eventually put behind the baby gate out of harms way. She was NOT impressed and there was a lot of protesting on her part.

Great Job Miss Reegan!!!!

Monday, November 19, 2007

So Christmas came early for Miss Larkyn this weekend. I was my intention to get this for her for Christmas but her daddy had other plans. Larkyn has been furniture walking for weeks now and loves it when we hold her hands and she can walk around. So David told me to get her a walker NOW instead of waiting until Christmas. This walker talks, sings, and lights up. Right now she enjoys sitting behind it and playing with all the buttons. I hope she realizes that she can actually walk behind it as well.

Saturday night my son lies down for a snuggle with the cat in the cat's bed. The next thing we know he's out like a light. I'm not sure Chloe appreciated the intrusion.

Thursday, November 15, 2007

What Is Wrong With This World!!!!

I was just going through some of my favorite blogs when I went to In the last post she gives you this link Here's what happening.. The US consulate in Guangzhou will not allow a mother and her adopted daughter to return to the US, The adoption has been finalized all the paper work is in order.. So you ask yourself WHY!!! Well if things could not be worse enough the reason they are not allowing it right now is because a few days ago her husband who was in China also, suddenly died!!!! Now not only is she dealing with the grief of loosing her partner but she my loose her little girl as well...

Please pray for this family and wish them a safe return....

19 1/2 pounds

Larkyn went to see the doctor today. He wanted to see her after three months. She's gained two pounds Yippeee!!!! All her blood work was fine as well. There is still some concern with her ECG.. and wants it done again in three months to determine if further testing is needed.

I am confident that in the end all will be well .

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Three Months Today

I had forgotten how short her hair was

Our fist Day together!!!!

Three months,, 90 Days.. It's hard to beleive Larkyn has only been with us for that short of time. She feels like she's been apart of our family from the day she was born.

I was looking back at pictures of when we first received Larkyn and in some ways she has changed and in other's she's still the same.

At this time last year I had said to myself that we would finally have our daughter, but as the months ticked by and still no referral I wondered. Even though the wait was frustrating I can't imagine not having THIS little girl. She was ment to be our daughter.

For all those out there who have adopted you know what I am feeling and talking about. For those of you who are still waiting, this day WILL come for you guys and when it does you will relize the waiting was ment for both you and your new child.

Look At Me Now!!!!

Friday, November 9, 2007

So this week our little Larkyn has accomplished the stairs, which means the gates went up. I have a house of hurdles now and every time Reegan wants to go up stairs I have to pick her up and help her over the gates...

This week I believe Larkyn actually said ma ma and ment me... Up until this week when she said ma ma or da da I assumed she was just saying the sounds... One evening I woke up in the middle of the night to hear her crying, by the time I got to her bedroom door she was standing up in her crib calling Ma Ma... She has started to give kisses as well, Larkyn changes each day it just amazing to watch her.

Our best helper the big sister is proving to amaze me each day as well. Larkyn just light's up when Reegan walks into the room... She knows that her big sister will think up something fun to do... whether it's hid and seek or just letting her crawl all over her on the floor.

I hope everyone out there is doing great and enjoy your weekend!!!!

Monday, November 5, 2007

Slamming the Door on Adoptions

I read this on blog

Slamming the Door on Adoption
Depriving Children Abroad of Loving Homes

By Elizabeth Bartholet
Sunday, November 4, 2007; Page B07

Last month, Guatemala was effectively shut down as a country from which children can be adopted into the United States. While the shutdown is officially temporary, it is likely that even when new laws are in place, Guatemala will follow the path taken by many South American countries in recent years: eliminating the private agencies and intermediaries that facilitate the placement of children who need homes and substituting government monopoly over adoption, which will reduce to a trickle the number of children escaping life in institutions or on the streets.

In recent years, Guatemala has been a model for those who believe in adoption as a vehicle for providing homeless children with permanent, nurturing parents. It has released significant numbers of children to international adoption, many at young ages, before they suffered the kind of damage that results in attachment disorders and other life-altering limitations. Ironically, these policies are why Guatemala attracted the attention of UNICEF and other human rights organizations that, along with our State Department, have been pushing for adoption "reform." These official "friends of children" have created pressure that has led to the cessation of international adoption in half the countries that in recent decades had been sending the largest number of homeless children abroad. Until recent years, the number of international adoptions into the United States had been steadily increasing, but the numbers are dramatically down.

Why close down international adoption? The real-world alternatives for the children at issue are life -- or death -- on the streets or in the types of institutions that a half-century of research has proved systematically destroy children's ability to grow up capable of functioning normally in society. By contrast, we know that adoption works incredibly well to provide children with nurturing homes and that it works best for those placed early in life.

Critics of international adoption argue that children have heritage rights and "belong" in their countries of birth. But children enjoy little in the way of heritage or other rights in institutions. The critics argue that we should develop foster-care alternatives for children in the countries they are from, and UNICEF's official position favors in-country foster care over out-of-country adoption. But foster care does not exist as a real option in most countries that allow children to be adopted abroad, and the generally dire economic circumstances in these nations make it extremely unlikely that comprehensive foster care programs will soon be developed. Nor is there any reason to think that children would do as well in foster care as in adoptive homes. Indeed, for decades the research in countries that use foster care, such as the United States, has shown that such care does not work nearly as well for children as adoption does.

Critics also condemn adoption abuses such as baby-buying. But there is no hard evidence that payments are systematically used in any country to induce birth parents to surrender their children. In any event, the right response to such abuses is stepped-up enforcement of the overlapping laws prohibiting such payments, which would rightly result in the lawbreakers being penalized. Closing down international adoption, however, wrongly penalizes all those homeless children who could otherwise find nurturing adoptive homes, condemning them to institutions or to the streets.

Policies restricting international adoption replicate the same-race matching policies that used to exist in the United States. In the mid-1990s, Congress passed the Multiethnic Placement Act, rejecting the notion that children should be seen as belonging only within the racial group into which they were born. Our lawmakers recognized the harm children suffered by virtue of being held in foster care rather than being adopted transracially.

Congress, the State Department and the human rights organizations that purport to care for children should similarly reject the notion that children in other countries must at all costs be kept in their communities of birth. Children's most fundamental human rights include the right to be nurtured in their formative years by permanent parents in real families.

Elizabeth Bartholetis a law professor and faculty director of the Child Advocacy Program atHarvard Law School. She is the author of the books "Family Bonds" and "Nobody's Children."